Darwin's Fox
RERFERENCES
A NEW POPULATION OF DARWIN'S FOXES
COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF DARWINS FOX
A NEW GEOGRAPHIC RECORD OF DARWINS FOX
DETECHING THE VANISHING POPULATIONS OF THE HIGHLY ENDANGERED DARWIN'S FOX
HABITAT AND DIET OF DARWIN'S FOX
DISCOVERY OF A CONTINENTAL POPULATION OF THE DARWIN'S FOX
CONSERVING THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED DARWIN'S FOX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pseudalopex fulvipes

Golden Jackal

The Darwin's Fox is endemic to Chile, found on the Chiloe Island and iat Nahuelbuta National Park. Darwin’s Foxes prefer secondary forest to old growth forest, such as conifers, evergreen, and fruit bearing trees. The mainland population is found in dense forest containing monkey-puzzle trees and five species of beech.

Darwin’s Foxes have short legs, elongated bodies, and short and bushy tails. Their coat is a mixture of black and gray hair with reddish markings on the ears and along the lower portion of the legs. White or light markings can be found under the chin and along the underbelly.

Darwin's Foxes are thought to be monogamous. They begin breeding in October. Litter size ranges from 2 to 3 kits. Both parents care for the young and offspring share territorial range with the parents.

Darwin's Foxes live around seven years. They are active both during the day and at night. They are non-territorial and solitary except during breeding season. Darwin's Foxes are omnivorous. The island population shows no fear of humans.

Darwin's Foxes are highly endangered. There are less than 100 Darwin Foxes on mainland Chile and 500 of the island population. in the island and mainland populations. Deforestation, agriculture, and disease transmitted from local dog populations all play a role in diminishing populations.

 

wolf eating

 

 

 

Golden Jackal and Frog

Golden Jackal feeding puppies

Golden Jackal and Hyena

red fox hunting mouseRed Fox hunting mouse

Pseudalopex fulvipes

Discovered by Charles Darwin

Critically Endangered

Omnivorous

6-8 Pounds

Mating Season: October

Produces 2-3 Pups

Lifespan: 7 years